SHORT BIO︎︎︎Frances Cathryn is a writer and curator focusing on the intersection of collective memory and contemporary art.

For a copy of her current CV, PDFs of papers or talks, or for questions and collaborations, email Frances or follow her on social media. If you are interested in mentoring or editorial advice, please reach out.

email: frances.wip@gmail.com
instagram: @wip_projects
pronouns: she/her/hers

STATEMENT︎︎︎Frances Cathryn recontextualizes stories as they’ve been told to us, combining archival research and social design to reimagine the American cultural landscape. Whether she leverages art and tech to create accessible educational tools, campaigns to redesign public space in her community, or produces scholarship on geopolitics and monumentation, Frances hopes to complicate institutional authority and enable others to challenge the power status quo.

ABOUT︎︎︎Frances writes cultural criticism on topics ranging from the myth of American exceptionalism and marginalized historical landscapes to material histories in design for children and memorials to the coronavirus for such publications as Frieze, the Los Angeles Review of Books, ARTnews, the Brooklyn Rail, and Social Text journal. She has presented her work at the Yale School of Art, MASS MoCA, NYU ITP, the Rhode Island School of Design, and the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, among others.

Frances has worked in history museums, arts journalism, and community organizing for more than a decade. She manages editorial projects at Forge Project, a new a Native-led initiative supporting leaders in arts and culture, decolonial education, food security, and land justice. In 2021–22, Frances is part of New Inc. at the New Museum, working in the Future Memory track to build an online curriculum that reconsiders how privileged source materials dictate who and what stories are credibly documented.


Frances is originally from southern Wisconsin on Hoocągra land, and is currently based in Kingston, New York, the unceded lands of the Lenapeyok and the Muh-he-con-ne-ok peoples.